EU Gets Even Uglier

January 2, 2007 § 13 Comments

The European Union has recently accepted Romania and Bulgaria as its newest partners in its efforts to… uh… hmmm… what exactly is the purpose of the European Union? Romania and Bulgaria are both extremely poor countries and will likely draw off of the more financially stable members of the EU. These two countries are also riddled with corruption, drugs and human trafficking into the sex industry. Adrian Morgan asks, What is the European Union Good For when he summarizes an article saying,

“While many think the EU will be a big help in stabilizing Iraq as the situation allows, the EU is nothing close to a super-power. As FSM Contributing Editor Adrian Morgan outlines, the EU came into existence artificially, and seems to specialize in creating thousands of unnecessary regulations. In fact, British citizens are now subject to 200,000 EU regulations, with 2,500 more added annually. Whereas the US has a set of values, all the EU can provide is a labyrinthine bureaucracy that would put Byzantium to shame. Do we need or even want their help?” (A. Morgan, Family Security Matters)

Without much knowledge of the EU, I must also ask, what is the purpose of the European Union and how is it effecting the Global Economy?

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§ 13 Responses to EU Gets Even Uglier

  • gess says:

    Does this has anything to do with Turkey and its relationship with EU?

  • Hakim says:

    “Does this has anything to do with Turkey and its relationship with EU?”

    Not exactly, I am interested in reader’s opinions concerning that question the overall intent of the European Union and its effects on the Global Economy?

    There are for example, a number of agencies developed as a result of the EU and the Maastricht Treaty that cover areas as important as monetary controls and political alliances.

    The following elements ironically called “pillars” are the foundation of the Union: the Euro, the European Communities (EC), the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP), the Justice and Home Affairs (JHA) and a European Political Cooperation (EPC).

    Does this Union suggest the development of a new and progressive superpower in the works?

  • Dirty Butter says:

    When the EU was first being discussed as a reality, I remember fundamentalist preachers calling it the rise of Babylon of The Revelation in the New Testament. By your question, maybe they weren’t so off base??

  • Hakim says:

    “I remember fundamentalist preachers calling it the rise of Babylon of The Revelation in the New Testament.”

    Interesting, I will examine this claim more closely and return with my thoughts. But in the meantime what do you think of the EU, if anything at all?

  • OmarG says:

    Salam, What do I think? Well, its an economic union above all else. Having a single currency is a good thing as far as the economy goes. But, political integration not to mention cultural integration will not be so rosy, nor will it bring the same benefits as the economic integration has. In any case, I do miss the italian lira something fierce…

  • Hakim says:

    “But, political integration not to mention cultural integration will not be so rosy, nor will it bring the same benefits as the economic integration has.”

    It is my opinion that one cannot exist without the other or else corruption will decay the Union from within.

    There must be political solidarity within the European Union, between its affiliates, and you’re right it will not be rosy, perhaps even a conflict of interest for some. Which leaves a choice of principle and values, however in our society the coin is king.

  • gess says:

    I see two reasons why Romania and Bulgaria were allowed to join in the EU. First, border security (Fortress Europe), and cheap labour.

  • Hakim says:

    “First, border security (Fortress Europe), and cheap labour.”

    I agree.

  • Dirty Butter says:

    You asked for my thoughts on the EU, if I had any, Hakim. I can see where the common currency would be good for the whole area, but I don’t see these countries blending to a common anything else. Each has centuries of ethnic and cultural pride that they’re not likely to want to subdue for a dull commonality.

  • Hakim says:

    “Each has centuries of ethnic and cultural pride that they’re not likely to want to subdue for a dull commonality.”

    I agree, there seemingly will always be a cultural-hegemony in the Union due to the distribution of power and politics world-wide. In addition, this concept of the EU seems strange, because isn’t the point of a union to offer equality to its members?

  • gregory says:

    ”Whereas the US has a set of values, all the EU can provide is a labyrinthine bureaucracy that would put Byzantium to shame.”

    I’d be interested to hear this author clarify just what exactly is the US’s set of values.

  • Wellwisher says:

    The old rivalries between the Western and Eastern blocks must not be forgotten. That the EU has been coaxing former Soviet-controlled nations to join them whether their countries are up to the minimum standard required of member states or not, begs many questions.

    Furthermore, several independant analyses concur on the fact that Turkey has made stupendous efforts to bring its systems in line with those of EU states, and is way ahead of Romania. Yet, Romania, for all its backwardness, is let into the exclusive club practically without a whimper, whereas Turkey is again and again denied everything.

    The truth seems to be that Turkey will never be allowed into the EU. As a Muslim state, it is viewed as being no better than a dog trying to copy its master. Turks will NEVER be considered European, even if they lift their country and wedge it between France and Germany.

    The tragedy is that Muslim states could have formed a formidable alliance, had their leaders not been selfish and greedy and utterly careless of their own people and of each other. Instead, whenever they stand to gain in any situation where another Muslim state is about to lose out, most of them do not hesitate to side with Western nations to the detriment of the other Islamic state – and in this, Turkey is the foremost among them, always anxious to please. Turkey’s Ka’abah is not in Mecca. It is in Brussels.

    So, like the dog that tries its best to serve its master, for all its trouble, Turkey gets a pat on the head and is locked outside. And that’s where it deserves to remain as long as it doesn’t realise where its true interests lie.

  • gess says:

    Liz Fekete puts more in context:

    “It is clear, for example, that the current popular discourse on the perceived failure of Muslims to ‘integrate’ can be situated within a wider European economic agenda. For, as well as its role in the ‘war on terror’, Islamophobia can also serve an economic purpose: as a tool to evacuate unwanted migrants from the labour market and replace them with the cheap, flexible and more easily assimilable labour provided by migrants from the new EU accession states of central and eastern Europe.”

    http://tinyurl.com/wbjpt

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