A Fart for Ramadan

November 16, 2006 § 13 Comments

This past Ramadan was very nice, it was very enjoyable, a release of a well anticipated break from my immergence in this dunya. But little did I know that this Ramadan I would receive one of the biggest shocks of my life. It all begain one evening at the masjid, which will remain nameless, however I will say it is one of the more beautiful masajid here in New York City. It was after iftar and during sajdahtun fi salatutarawih that a brother farted!

I couldn’t believe my ears, it was such a strange occurence because one moment I was prostrating to God, “glorifying the most high”, and the next moment I was accosted by the most nefarious sound ever to grace my ears during a prayer and during Ramadanutarawih prayers! Then when everyone rose to aq-qauma, no one budged. Not a single Soul admitted to this egregious act by stepping out of the prayer-line.

Evidently, I was expecting the brother to step away, since his prayers were going to be invalid. But thinking back, I probably would have done the same thing to save myself the embarrassment. At the time I was kind of angry as I growled to myself, astaghfirullah, ‘udubillah! I thought to myself, ahhhh, ash-shait’an must be making wasawah to the brother. But now, my thinking reversed; my heart changed and goes out to the brother because I have no idea how embarrassing that may have been for him. It might have been very devastating.

Anyway, I just wanted to send a shot-out to the tarawih-farter and let you know, ‘I… heard that’. But its all good and I hope you had a blessed Ramadan and a festive ‘eid, maa’ salaama ya akhi.

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§ 13 Responses to A Fart for Ramadan

  • DrM says:

    LOL, that was hilarious. You know what they say “whoever smelled it, dealt it.” A spicy iftar perhaps?

  • M. Shahin says:

    Salaam Alaikum,

    That was funny. I’m glad you reevaluated the situation and opened your heart to the brother. It is not often that we are merciful towards others.

  • AnonyMouse says:

    Ufff, I’m afraid I know from experience just how embarassing it is for that to happen… *Cringes*

  • OmarG says:

    Hopefully he wasn’t in the row directly in front of you when he let loose??

  • Abu Sahajj says:

    “Hopefully he wasn’t in the row directly in front of you when he let loose??”

    He was… but slightly to the left so I have no idea who it was. My kids have made up silly stories about a phantom-man that no one ever sees called the “tarawih-farter”! Like a boogey-man… kids are so silly.

  • Abu Sahajj says:

    “Ufff, I’m afraid I know from experience just how embarassing it is for that to happen… *Cringes*”

    Salaam sis… I have one question for you, did you get off the line?

  • OmarG says:

    LOL. He should have at least let out a warning: “Back blast area: all clear!” But, as a wise person always said, “Better to talk about an anonymous farter in your midst than being the one talked about.”

    But, then again, standing in line for a prayer that doesn’t count has got to be a waste of time. Did you check for anyone praying rakats by themselves afterwards?

  • Muslim Apple says:

    Asalamu alaykum,

    Perhaps the brother did not know what to do, many people may come to perform taraweeh that do not usually come to the masjid or have much Islamic knowledge.

    The sunnah being to being to hold one’s nose as if one has a nosebleed and exit the line. This action which I have seen from time to time always amazes me because the person put their adherence to the sunnah above the embarrassment factor.

  • Dirty Butter says:

    You’ll have to explain to this non Muslim why a natural bodily function, no matter how amusing, negates a prayer, as long as it was not done intentionally? God made our bodies that way, so what’s the problem, other than the embarrassment?

  • Abu Sahajj says:

    “You’ll have to explain to this non Muslim why a natural bodily function, no matter how amusing, negates a prayer, as long as it was not done intentionally?”

    The act of passing gas does not negate ones prayer per se, it actually negates one state of purity which in turn negates one’s salah. Muslims are particular to purity and prayer we believe they go hand-in-hand and with out a certain level of purity… well you get the point.

    In order to achieve a menial level of purity (enough for prayer) we perform an ablution called wudu’ in Arabic.

    I wrote an article on wudu’ entitled, The Beauty of Wudu’ I think you will enjoy it… its a good article for non-Muslims I think.

    wasalaam

  • Dirty Butter says:

    Thank you for trying to answer my question, and I do understand, up to a point. But it really is beyond my fundamental belief of how I can come to God in prayer that makes this hard for me to comprehend.

  • Abu Sahajj says:

    “But it really is beyond my fundamental belief of how I can come to God in prayer that makes this hard for me to comprehend.”

    The Muslim’s daily salah is not a prayer in the typical sense of the word. There is no equivelent term for salah in english however it is more or less a sacred act of worship performed daily therefor purity is extremly important when performing this.

    On the other hand, we have prayers more in common with what I think you understand as prayer. But we call these prayers supplications or in Arabic du’a. It is not necessary to perform the ablution (wudu’) prior to performing this (although it is preferred). They can also be done in any language.

    You see the ablution (wudu’) for Muslims is not as foreign as you might think as Seyyed Hossein Nasr suggests,

    “Five times a day, determined by cosmic events and not any mechanical or electronic means, Muslims must make a ritual ablution, which is a purification like the Catholic confession, and then perform the prayers (salah).”

    I hope this was more helpful, perhaps I can share with you or anyone else a suggestion as this comment by DB has drummed up a great deal of views to the wudu’ article, there is a book entitled, The Heart of Islam: Enduring Values for Humanity by Seyyed Hossein Nasr which I highly recommend as a good start understanding Islam. The book is meant as an explanation of Islam to non-Muslims particularly Christians, by one of Islam’s most notable scholars.

    wasalaam

  • Dirty Butter says:

    Ah, so you do have what I would call personal prayer, as well as these ritual prayers. I’m glad to hear that, as to have ONLY ritual prayers, in my beliefs, is to not have prayer at all. The comparison to the Catholic confession ritual was very helpful in understanding ablution. Thank you for patiently explaining.

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