JHD or HRB

November 1, 2006 § 6 Comments

The question is that although jihad has been attributed to the violent “terrorist” efforts shouldn’t someone explain the difference between jihad and hareb? I think so because if someone doesn’t we Muslims will lose the ability to refer to an aspect of Islam which we consider dignified, noble and a salatufisabillah. Well Khaled Abou El-Fadl has done just that recently in an interview where he declares,

“When I write an article speaking to extremists and convincing them that they are wrong theologically and morally and legally,” says Abu El Fadl, “I consider my self in a state of jihad. I expect to be rewarded by God.”

Professor Streusand goes on to explain,

“The term in Islamic law which best describes the activities of al Qaeda is hirabah, which originally meant brigandage, but has a more general meaning as sinful warfare, if our elected officials started saying ‘This is a war against hirabis,’ that would be more effective. It would certainly be better than using the term jihad or jihadis which is actively harmful.” (G. Raz, NPR) audio2

In closing I must say that I agree, that using HRB as opposed to JHD would be the most effective strategy instead of inviting inflammatory language like Islamic-Fascists and things like that. However, this would only be a good idea if offending Muslims wasn’t a part of the overall agenda.

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§ 6 Responses to JHD or HRB

  • Fahad says:

    The question is that although jihad has been attributed to the violent “terrorist” efforts shouldn’t someone explain the difference between jihad and hareb? I think so because if someone doesn’t we Muslims will lose the ability to refer to an aspect of Islam which we consider dignified, noble and a salatufisabillah.

    Salam.

    I have had a small article in mind on this topic “Jihad is NOT “holy war”” . I will write it soon on my blog, inshallah.

  • dawood says:

    Has anyone ever read this book I mentioned in a post here? If so, then I am interested in how this relates to the discussion at hand.

    I feel that unless we can “reclaim” our own nuanced terminology, then we will never be able to reverse this process of Islamophobia.

  • Abu Sahajj says:

    “I feel that unless we can “reclaim” our own nuanced terminology, then we will never be able to reverse this process of Islamophobia.”

    Well there are several ways it can be done… however we tend to only use two… The first is through scholarly discussion, however the drawback is that these discussion usually are entertained by a select group willing to indulge their interests in progressive thought.

    The second is a clumsy protest resulting in bloodshed and exhausted paranoid non-Muslims. However effective, the drawback is certainly an obstacle for Muslims in the long run…

    So either someone will have to come up with a new way to address the matter or do as El-Fadl (from the article above) has done and address the issue through scholasticism and intellectualism.

  • dawood says:

    Yup, I feel that this will be a long, hard road. Unfortunately. I am becoming more convinced with my dealings in the Muslim community here that “God does not change a people until they change their own selves”, and in many cases, people do not want to change.

  • Abu Sahajj says:

    “I am becoming more convinced with my dealings in the Muslim community here that “God does not change a people until they change their own selves”, and in many cases, people do not want to change.”

    I think the Muslim Ummah is the most diverse bunch on the planet, however since the removal of the khalif there aren’t any people in power who have their finger on the pulse of the Ummah.

    Most sheikhs have their fingers on the pulse of their nation, constituents or madh’hab. Which far from what we need… it further divides us… are there any answers?

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