Islam Reform in Cyberspace

October 20, 2006 § 13 Comments

In the West there has been a strong effort to effectively change the negative perceptions that people have of Islam and Muslims. Our fight against ignorance has been rather successful but full of surprises. In the West we found that cyberspace is a viable medium for the exchange of ideas on Islam. However, we are not the only Muslims that have made use of the Internet as discussed in the following article,

“In the Muslim world, radicals, reformers, activists and academics are all struggling to reshape their religion. The debates often take place in cyberspace, or on Arabic-language satellite broadcasts.” (D. Amos, NPR) audio2

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§ 13 Responses to Islam Reform in Cyberspace

  • M. Shahin says:

    Salaams,

    I’m glad Muslims are using cyberspace to dispell some of the myths around Islam, and I think blogs are a great tool in doing that.

    Many people are leaving behind TV, and are choosing the Internet, so Muslims must get busy. Our job is much easier now because we can make dawa right from our homes at the computer.

    Thanks for sharing this.

    Wa Salaam.

  • Abu Sahajj says:

    “Many people are leaving behind TV, and are choosing the Internet, so Muslims must get busy. Our job is much easier now because we can make dawa right from our homes at the computer.

    Yes… I think that the shift in media attention is beginning to balance the scales a bit.

  • DrM says:

    One of the negatives about cyberspace are the numbers of crooks, charlatans and gutter snipes pretending to be Muslims, whether its neocon/neolib style pro-regressives.

  • Abu Sahajj says:

    “One of the negatives about cyberspace are the numbers of crooks, charlatans and gutter snipes pretending to be Muslims, whether its neocon/neolib style pro-regressives.”

    Yeah but what would the Internet be without fake Muslims? Probably a lot less fun.

    wasalaam

  • Dirty Butter says:

    At least you some some means of spotting a fake Muslim site. I don’t, and that’s disconcerting. Here I am, trying to learn about the Muslim viewpoint, and I have to deal with fakes, too? No fun!

    Pardon me for going off topic, but I have a question to ask, and I can’t seem to find an answer for it anywhere. In the Bible there are certain numbers that have special meaning, such as 7, 3, and 12. Are there any similar symbolic numbers in the Koran? Our pastor is doing an overview comparison of Islam and Christianity on Wednesday nights, and this question came up last week. He did not have an answer. I thought you probably would.

  • Abu Sahajj says:

    “Are there any similar symbolic numbers in the Koran?”

    Yes, there are several references to numbers however, not for the sake of the “numbers” but their importance in context, for example the number 7 which you have mentioned is most famous for its reference to the 7 heavens…

    “So He completed them as seven firmaments in two Days, and He assigned to each heaven its duty and command. And We adorned the lower heaven with lights, and (provided it) with guard. Such is the Decree of (Him) the Exalted in Might, Full of Knowledge.” (41:12)

  • Dirty Butter says:

    Thanks for the quick response, Abu Sahajj. As for your original post, I, for one, have tried to take full advantage of the Internet to learn as much as I can about Islam and the viewpoints of more moderate Muslims. Your blog, and the Kashmiri’s, have been most enlightening.

  • Abu Sahajj says:

    “Thanks for the quick response, Abu Sahajj.”

    You are very welcome. I think there is a lecture you would be interested in… it is actually a lecture by a white convert who is now one of the most promenent Islamic scholars in the West. His name is Sheikh Hamza Yusuf Hanson and his lecture is entitled, Understanding Jihad in Islam, this lecture was with a group of non-Muslim educators (elementary through collegiate) in the SanFrancisco area.

    “As for your original post, I, for one, have tried to take full advantage of the Internet to learn as much as I can about Islam and the viewpoints of more moderate Muslims.

    I must say that the term “moderate Muslim” for most Muslims is offensive, because by our definitions a Muslim (A submitter) who is moderate (moderately submitting) is undesirable.

    “Your blog, and the Kashmiri’s, have been most enlightening.”

    Thank you, that is a very kind thing to say about such a simple effort (mine), the Kashmiri Nomad does have a fine site… and I like the new look.

  • Dirty Butter says:

    I don’t mean to offend by calling you a moderate Muslim. I’m sorry. It’s just that you find some sights that rant and rave about Christianity, and you find some that rant and rave about Islam. I’m turned off by both. How would you characterize yourself and the Kashmiri? You certainly don’t come across as proponents of terrorism!

  • Dirty Butter says:

    I tried to listen to the lecture, but I could only get part of it.

  • Abu Sahajj says:

    “I tried to listen to the lecture, but I could only get part of it.”

    My apologies… you may find the entire lecture here.

  • Abu Sahajj says:

    “How would you characterize yourself and the Kashmiri?”

    Considering my particular situation here in the US, I would have to say that the most acceptable labe I find for myself is “progressive”.

    ” You certainly don’t come across as proponents of terrorism!”

    Neither do the majority of Muslims of which there are over 2 billion in number. Believe me if 2 billion Muslims became proponents of terrorism the world would be a very different place than it is now, do you agree?

  • Dirty Butter says:

    Neither do the majority of Muslims of which there are over 2 billion in number. Believe me if 2 billion Muslims became proponents of terrorism the world would be a very different place than it is now, do you agree?

    I certainly DO agree, Abu Sahajj! That’s what motivates me to learn more about what the majority of Muslims think and believe. The way to combat prejudice is to gain knowledge, which dispels pre-judging.

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